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alt="photo gallery", "peru", "itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt"
photo by Valeria

alt="photo gallery", "peru", "itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt"

alt="photo gallery", "peru", "itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt"

alt="photo gallery", "peru", "itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt"

alt="photo gallery", "peru", "itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt"

                                                    © Gordon Hunt 2016. All content by Gordon Hunt unless otherwise stated

Peru: Gallery
                           

 

As a hybrid of two units, the apartment featured some strange spaces and geometries. Of particular note was the “guest bedroom,” which consisted of a pull-out couch situated in a triangular-shaped hallway that led to the bedrooms. Too small to serve as a room and too large to be a hallway, the space lacked natural light, privacy, and identity. The apartment was rented, which provided a challenge for anyone wishing to claim the space as their own, because the lease stipulated that no alterations were to occur. While all three residents were creative in their own right, one of the characteristic features of the apartment was the collection of artwork, completed by guests and friends from all over the world who had come to stay with them. Oddly enough, there was a distinct lack of their own creative work on display, and so I decided to address this issue in the first of my Peruvian Interventions.

This proposal is an extension of their existing gallery space, but one that analyses the relationship between artist/photographer and guest/host. As their current gallery is made up of creative works from other travellers and framed by structures made by Nicolo, Valeria, and Julie, I thought I would reverse the roles. I, a traveller, will make the framing devices for them to put on display some of their photography in the space where the traveller sleeps. This redefined “room” reverses the relationships between the host, the traveller, and the art.

The most dynamic aspect of the Intervention, aside from the didactic evolution of displayed photography, is the nylon wire upon which the photos are hung. My documentation can’t do it justice, but the transparency and geometries of the nylon plays with light and shadow to an extent I hadn’t anticipated. The shadows cast are faint, but reveal more of the pattern than the nylon itself, and the reflections of direct light create a shimmering effect. At first the nylon canopy goes unnoticed, but upon taking a closer look, a glimmer of the nylon spider-web begins to appear. The current lighting isn’t the best to emphasize this, but hopefully a change is in the works.

Nicolo has already started using this space as a secondary study-area, using the photos as inspiration as he writes his thesis. This is an unexpected result as I never considered giving the house a quiet place in which to study—the space had always been an awkward room given to the guests; I merely sought to give it some identity. I consider it a success, as long as it doesn’t fall apart.