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alt="itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt", "Bangkok", "Meditation Garden"

alt="itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt", "Bangkok", "Meditation Garden"

alt="itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt", "Bangkok", "Meditation Garden"

alt="itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt", "Bangkok", "Meditation Garden"
the table's legs collapse into the tabletop...

alt="itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt", "Bangkok", "Meditation Garden"
...and fit snugly into an unsightly hole in the window

alt="itinerant architect", "Gordon Hunt", "Bangkok", "Meditation Garden"
(unsightly hole)

                                                    © Gordon Hunt 2016. All content by Gordon Hunt unless otherwise stated

Thailand: Meditation Garden
                           

 

The apartment belonged to Wisharawish, one of Thailand’s top designers and winner of the illustrious Mango fashion award in 2012. His apartment was modest, and had been turned into an atelier with clothes racks, materials, and sketches strewn all over the place. One very nice quality about his fourth floor apartment was that it had a balcony on the north and south facades which enabled amazing ventilation that approached gale-force at times. These breezes limited the need for air conditioning while providing Wish with two exterior spaces in which to grow small plants, something the people of Bangkok do with admirable fervor. Although his north-facing balcony was filled with plants (and more importantly, water), the sunny southern balcony was essentially used for storage and cockroaches.

I decided to re-integrate the southern balcony into the rest of the apartment by creating a new use for it. As the other balcony had many plants, I decided to treat this one in the opposite manner, choosing materials that required far less maintenance and were durable (at least in terms of sun and rain). And so I turned the balcony into a meditative garden of sorts, seeking to create a more intimate space where one can enjoy being outdoors and yet still appreciate the Bangkok skyline without the clamor and bustle of the streets below.

As the sun is simply too hot to make this space comfortable during the day, I focused on how it might be used after the sun goes down. Lighting played an important role, and it was important for me that the light provided an ambiance that would invite Wish and his friends to spend some evening-time enjoying the space. For this purpose I also built a small table that can be compressed and stored in an unsightly hole in the window.